Mid-term reviews of Avoidable Blindness Programmes show considerable progress

2016 marked the half-way point for each of our programmes. To mark this milestone, three independent reviews were commissioned to evaluate the achievements so far and make recommendations about how we can increase our impact.

In 2014, the Trust officially joined the global movement to end avoidable blindness with the launch of our Avoidable Blindness Programme. We are now working to combat three major avoidable causes of blindness – blinding trachoma, diabetic retinopathy and retinopathy of prematurity. We have also established the Commonwealth Eye Health Consortium, which aims to strengthen the eye healthcare sector as a whole across the Commonwealth.

2016 marked the half-way point for each of these programmes. To mark this milestone, three independent reviews were commissioned to evaluate the achievements so far and make recommendations about how the programmes can increase their impact:

Diabetic Retinopathy and Retinopathy of Prematurity Initiatives  

The independent review of the Trust’s Diabetic Retinopathy and Retinopathy of Prematurity initiatives has praised the progress being made to tackle these diseases in India.

The report said that both initiatives are increasing awareness of the diseases across India and providing vital screening and laser treatment for patients. “The Initiatives are training doctors and nurses on how to provide high quality care in order to reduce the risk of these complications of preterm birth and diabetes. Patients and their carers are also being counselled to help manage these diseases. This will prevent more premature babies and people with diabetes from needlessly going blind.”

Trachoma Initiative

An independent review of trachoma elimination programmes supported by the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID) and the Trust has shown that both programmes are achieving significant results ‘on an unprecedented’ scale.

A key finding from the report was that “the Trachoma Initiatives have recorded success in areas where the trachoma community faced major challenges to date.”  

Commonwealth Eye Health Consortium

An independent review of the Commonwealth Eye Health Consortium has commended the progress that was made in its first two years and for the numerous successes it has had to date.

According to the review, the Commonwealth Eye Health Consortium has exceeded its initial targets.  It has managed to “train a very large number of fellows in clinical sub-specialities, public health for eye care and research skills, and fellows report a higher level of satisfaction with training received”

To read a summary of each report on the Trust’s Avoidable Blindness Programmes please visit: www.jubileetribute.org/publica...